How Long Does a Speeding Ticket Stay on Your Record? (By State)

Types of California Traffic Tickets

Traffic tickets are issued in California for a variety of infractions:

  • Failed equipment, such as a headlight being out
  • Non-moving violations, such as parking violations
  • Moving violations, such as speeding
  • Improper paperwork, such as not having proof of insurance, missing or expired driver’s license, and expired registration

Speeding tickets and auto insurance eligibility

Having a speeding ticket on your record may affect more than just how much you pay for insurance — it could affect your eligibility for coverage with various car insurance companies. But how long does a speeding ticket affect your auto insurance premium? To determine your driver risk level, insurance companies will evaluate your MVR and Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange (CLUE) report to learn how many accidents, tickets and other incidents such as DUIs you have had in the past three to five years, on average. Each company will have its own underwriting guidelines dictating how far back they will assess your motor vehicle record.

The number of incidents and the severity of these incidents may also influence your auto insurer when it is determining your premium. The more tickets and other incidents you have on your MVR and CLUE, and the more severe those incidents are, the higher chances you encounter auto insurers who decline to write your policy. This can become further complicated if your driver’s license was suspended. Finding auto insurance coverage with a suspended license can be tricky, but it is possible. You may need to choose an auto insurer specifically geared toward insuring high-risk drivers.

Video

Responding to a Ticket

When you receive a ticket, it will have information on how to pay as well as the deadline to do so. For most tickets, everything you need to do can be completed through mail or online. If you receive a ticket for a misdemeanor, you will have to go to court. The “Notice to Appear” found on your ticket will include the name of the court that will decide your case, the deadline to pay the ticket or go to court, and what you must do to respond to the ticket. Most courts will also follow up with a courtesy notice sent in the mail around two to three weeks after you receive your ticket. If that time passes and you have not received your courtesy notice, you can also contact the court in the county you received the ticket with any questions you have. That court will be listed in the “Notice to Appear,” or you access court contact information.

If you would like to take traffic school, wait for the courtesy notice to come in the mail, or contact the appropriate court if you are unsure about eligibility. You will have to pay an administrative fee to the court, but not the full penalty of the ticket. Send back notice of your intent to attend traffic school along with the required fee, which will be included with the courtesy notice. The court will reply back with acknowledgement and acceptance of your intention to attend traffic school and provide a deadline for completion. Traffic school can reduce the financial penalty of a ticket, and remove from your record, as explained below.

An exception to the above comes from San Diego County, whose courts require you to pay for their ticket while completing traffic school. If you receive a ticket in San Diego County, the court will send you information explaining this policy.

Consider pay-per-mile insurance when comparing rates with a speeding ticket

If your car insurance rates do go up, you may want to shop around for a better rate. Insurance companies might consider the same speeding ticket differently when determining your premium.

If you don’t often drive, one way to keep your car insurance costs low is to consider pay-per-mile auto insurance. While you may have higher rates because of your infractions, pay-per-mile auto insurance can help you control costs, as you typically pay a monthly base rate to keep your insurance coverage and a per-mile rate of a few cents for each mile you drive.

What Is Considered a Clean Driving Record in Florida?

In Florida, a clean driving record is considered to be one that is free of any moving violations, accidents, or points. However, the definition of this varies in the minds of insurers and employers. In the eyes of an insurer, a good driving record may be regarded as one that has no previous claims, whereas an employer may be more interested in any violations you may have and may be willing to overlook any minor ones.

Speeding Tickets and Car Insurance Premiums

A speeding violation can increase your car insurance rates by a few hundred dollars per year. The following factors will determine how much your premiums will go up for speeding:

  • Your car insurance company
  • Your driving record and how many driving violations you have as well as the types of violations
  • Whether you’ve received violations in the past
  • How many miles per hour over the speed limit you were driving
  • The location of the violation

Depending on your auto insurance company, you may be able to reduce the impact of your speeding ticket on your rate if you take a defensive driving course. Your provider might also have a ticket forgiveness program that could improve your situation.

Research shows that car insurance rates may go up as much as 95 percent after getting a speeding ticket. If you’ve had multiple speeding tickets or were way above the speed limit, your premium will go up more than someone who has never received a speeding ticket before and was only speeding a bit.

Other Consequences of Getting a Speeding Ticket

Beyond points against your record, receiving a speeding ticket may have the following consequences:

  • You must pay a fine: Fines are based on how fast you were driving and the circumstances. For example, driving 10 mph over the speed limit incurs an $81 fine and increases to $126 fine for driving 30 mph over the posted limit. Speeding in certain areas, like a construction or school zone, can increase the fine. Fines may exceed $1,000 if somebody was injured as a result of your speeding.

  • You can’t qualify for a “good driver” discount. Many auto insurers incentivize good drivers with a discount when they exhibit safe driving behaviors. This discount is quantified with their telematics technology that analyzes driving habits, such as braking, nighttime driving and of course, speeding.

  • You may be required to file Form SR-22. If you were speeding while also committing another major driving violation, like driving under the influence, then the court may require you to file Form SR-22. Form SR-22 is a financial responsibility certificate that confirms you meet the minimum car insurance limits in your state and requires your auto insurer to alert the DMV if you drop coverage.

  • Speeding can lead to fatalities. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, speed-related crashes accounted for 9,000 deaths (26% of all crash fatalities) in 2019. Speeding is a high-risk driving behavior where other people may pay the ultimate cost.

Auto insurance premiums will increase 20%, on average, when a speeding violation is listed in your driving record.

Examples of Points Assigned for Traffic Violations

The points system is based on a wide range of traffic violations. Be careful, many points may be added to your driver record. Notable examples include:

• 3 to 11 points will be added to your driving record: Speeding (depends on the amount over the limit) • 3 Points will be added to your driving record: Failing to yield the right-of-way • 3 Points will be added to your point total: Leaving the scene of an accident (property damage only) • 5 Points: Reckless driving • 5 Points: Railroad crossing violation • 5 Points: Using a cell phone while driving

State Comparison: Speeding Ticket Length on Driving Record

The length of time a speeding ticket remains on your driving record typically takes three to five years but it will vary by state. The time thresholds below may reflect the speeding violation falling off your record or how far back your employers and insurance carriers can check. States that explicitly state that speeding ticket points fall off your record but remain on your permanent driving record are distinguished with an asterisk (*).

State

Speeding ticket length of time on driving record

Points against your driving record

Alabama

2 years*

2-5 points

Alaska

1-1.5 years

2-6 points

Arizona

1 year*

3 points

Arkansas

3 years

3-8 points

California

3 years, 3 months

2 points

Colorado

7 years

1-12 points

Connecticut

3 years

1 points

Delaware

5 years

2-5 points

District of Columbia

5 years

3 points

Florida

5 years

2-6 points

Georgia

10 years

N/A

Hawaii

3 years

3-4 points

Idaho

5 years

5-50 points

Illinois

2 years

2-6 points

Indiana

5 years*

N/A

Iowa

3 years

N/A

Kansas

5 years

3-6 points

Kentucky

5 years

N/A

Louisiana

1 year*

4-6 points

Maine

3 years

1-5 points

Maryland

N/A

2 points

Massachusetts

7 years

2-4 points

Michigan

10 years

N/A

Minnesota

N/A

N/A

Mississippi

3-5 years

3 points

Missouri

3 years*

3 points

Montana

5 years

0-4 points

Nebraska

1 year*

1-5 points

Nevada

3 years

3-4 points

New Hampshire

1 year*

2-5 points

New Jersey

1 year

N/A

New Mexico

1.5 years*

3-11 points

New York

7 years

3 points

North Carolina

1 point removed every 3 months

1-15 points

North Dakota

2 years

2-8 points

Ohio

3 years

2-4 points

Oklahoma

5 years

N/A

Oregon

1 year

2-5 points

Pennsylvania

N/A

N/A

Rhode Island

N/A

2-6 points

South Carolina

3 years

2 points

South Dakota

10 years

1-8 points

Tennessee

3 years

N/A

Texas

3 years

35-75 points

Utah

5-10 years

2-8 points

Vermont

11 years

6 points

Virginia

5 years

N/A

Washington

5 years

3-6 points

West Virginia

5 years

3-6 points

Wisconsin

10 years

N/A

Wyoming

2 years*

2-5 points

Get Multiple Quotes Online Fast!

How long do license points impact your driving privileges?

With regards to your eligibility to drive, your state’s DMV may only consider citations or convictions (or points) accumulated within a more limited time frame.

In the 41 states (plus Washington, D.C.) that use a point system to determine driving eligibility, points only impact your license suspension for a certain amount of time.

States that don’t have point systems also typically have time limits for how long an infraction will impact your driving privileges, although the formulas are more complex. For example:

In New York, points impact your driving privileges for 18 months, while in Idaho they last for three years. In Minnesota, your license will be suspended if you have four traffic offenses in one year or five offenses in two years.

You’re also likely to face more stringent requirements if you are a younger driver.

How to reduce the points on your license

In some states, you can reduce the number of points on your license by taking a defensive driving course.

Taking a defensive driving class usually doesn’t actually reduce the number of points you have or completely clear your driving record. The class just keeps you from losing your license.

Completing a defensive driving course may also automatically reduce your car insurance premium. For example, in New York, a defensive driving class will reduce your insurance premium by 10% for three years.

Classes may be offered in person or online. Availability varies by state, but defensive driving classes generally cover:

Driving techniques The times of day that are most and least safe to drive Other driving-related statistics.

The Bottom Line

Traffic violations don't just affect your driving record, they also have an impact on how much your insurance costs. Your rates will increase based on the type of violation you commit and your insurer, but you may not be stuck with higher premiums. Check with your insurer to see whether there are ways to reduce your costs.

Average Insurance Premium Increases

Take a look at the average insurance premium increase for your state after one accident:

Insurance Premium Increase by State (Smallest to Largest)

 Rank  State  Average Rate Increase 1 New York $80 2 Connecticut $147 3 Tennessee $153 4 New Hampshire $157 5 Indiana $190 6 Nebraska $200 7 Georgia $222 8 Maine $272 9 (tie) North Dakota $277 9 (tie) Pennsylvania $277 11 Minnesota $283 12 Ohio $294 13 Vermont $295 14 Kansas $299 15 Delaware $308 16 Mississippi $319 17 Washington $322 18 Missouri $328 19 Hawaii $334 20 West Virginia $339 21 Illinois $340 22 Wisconsin $351 23 South Dakota $355 24 Rhode Island $356 25 Idaho $363 26 Colorado $368 27 Alabama $397 28 Virginia $406 29 Oklahoma $410 30 Iowa $420 31 Utah $422 32 South Carolina $425 33 Maryland $452 34 Wyoming $480 35 Montana $492 36 North Carolina $500 37 Arkansas $510 38 Massachusetts $566 39 Texas $586 40 Oregon $606 41 California $608 42 Louisiana $684 43 Alaska $687 44 New Mexico $759 45 Nevada $808 46 Michigan $810 47 New Jersey $835 48 Florida $843 49 Arizona $865 50 Kentucky $893 51 District of Columbia $1,041 Average total increase $446

Frequently Asked Questions

  • The state you live in and how fast you were going will determine your speeding ticket fine. On average, however, a speeding ticket in the U.S. will run $150. In addition to the fine, you can expect your car insurance rates to go up by anywhere from 26 to 30 percent.

  • If you’re pulled over by a police officer, you’ll receive a speeding ticket immediately. A speeding ticket issued by a camera or airborne radar may take a few weeks. Once you receive the ticket and pay your fine, the speeding ticket will get added to your driving record.

  • Some states will suspend your driver’s license if you accumulate too many speeding tickets in a short amount of time. It all depends on the point system in the area you received a speeding or other moving violation. If your state only lets you get 12 points in a year, for example, you might face a suspension if you receive 15 points in one year. You may also have to pay a fine and take a driving safety course before you’re allowed to reinstate your license.

  • If you ignore a speeding ticket and don’t pay it, it won’t disappear. Instead, you’ll put yourself at risk for higher fines, a driver’s license suspension, and other serious consequences. It’s your responsibility to either pay your ticket, negotiate it, or dispute it in court.

  • Unfortunately, even a single speeding ticket can cause your car insurance rates to go up. That’s why it’s important to be mindful of your speed and follow the speed limit at all times, even when you’re in a hurry.

Cheap insurance after a speeding ticket

Auto insurance companies will typically pull a new motor vehicle report at your renewal time, which is when they’ll see your ticket and possibly raise your rates. You can ask your insurance agent how long the ticket will affect your rates. In some states, driver’s license points are different than insurance points, so it can be hard to know exactly when a ticket will stop costing you.

Check out these ways to get cheap car insurance.

Average insurance increase methodology: EverQuote analyzed premiums reported by our users. We compared premiums for drivers with clean records (no accidents or tickets) vs. drivers who had a speeding ticket. Premiums are based on policies with liability of 100/300/50 ($100,000 bodily injury per person, $300,000 bodily injury per accident, $50,000 property damage) and uninsured motorist coverage of 100/300 ($100,000 per person, $300,000 per accident). We used premiums collected between Jan. 1, 2017, and Dec. 31, 2018. Your own rates will be different.

More:

Tags