Does car insurance cover flat tires? (Coverage Tips)

Content of the material

  1. 1. Does Car Insurance Cover Tire Damage?
  2. Video
  3. Consider custom parts and equipment coverage
  4. Tips to Avoid Tire Blowouts
  5. 1) Be sure to pick the right tires.
  6. 2) Regularly check the depth of the tire design and change them when worn.
  7. 3) Check the pressure every month.
  8. When Auto Insurance Doesn’t Cover Flat Tires
  9. Does Insurance Covers Tire Damage from Potholes?
  10. Will auto insurance cover a flat tire if I have roadside assistance?
  11. Auto Insurance May Cover Vehicle Damage Caused by a Flat Tire
  12. Manufacturer, Retailer, and Installer Liability
  13. Other Types Of Coverage
  14. Does Roadside Assistance Cover Tires?
  15. Road Hazard Protection Plans
  16. Can Roadside Assistance Help You with Flat Tires?
  17. Frequently Asked Questions: Are tire blowouts covered by insurance?
  18. #1 – How much does it cost to fix a blown-out tire and what kind of damage can a tire blowout cause?
  19. #2 – Can a tire blowout be fixed and is a tire blowout considered an accident?
  20. #3 – Do tire warranties cover nails or flats?
  21. #4 – Do tire warranties cover dry rot or sidewall damage?
  22. #5 – Do tire warranties cover punctures or blowouts? Do tire warranties cover bubbles?
  23. #6 – Does a tire warranty cover nails or sidewall damage?
  24. #7 – Does Geico cover tire blowout?
  25. #8 – Does car insurance cover tire blowout damage?
  26. #9 – Is tire blowout damage comprehensive or collision?
  27. #10 – Does a warranty cover a blown tire? What does a tire warranty cover?
  28. Are tire blowouts really a big deal?
  29. How Insurance Can Cover Slashed Tires
  30. Comprehensive Covers Acts Of Vandalism
  31. Collision Covers Potholes Or Road Spikes
  32. Does Car Insurance Cover Tire Blowouts?
  33. 9. Will Auto Insurance Cover Tire Damage?

1. Does Car Insurance Cover Tire Damage?

Your car insurance policy typically won’t pay to fix or replace a flat tire, unless it’s the result of an accident. However, many insurers (including Does car insurance cover tire damage?Does car insurance cover flat tires?(1)

Aug 4, 2021 — Typically if your automotive policy includes comprehensive and collision insurance, your coverage will include any tires damaged during Is Tire Replacement Covered by Insurance?Does Car Insurance Cover Tires?(2)

Apr 15, 2021 — Typically, auto insurance companies don’t include coverage for flat tires because that’s considered wear and tear on your vehicle. However, if (3)

Video

Consider custom parts and equipment coverage

If your ride has custom wheels or rims, custom parts and equipment coverage (CPE) will repair or replace these parts if they’re damaged in a covered accident. The cost of replacing custom wheels is much higher than replacing standard tires. And if your custom wheels weren’t installed by the original manufacturer, you should consider insuring them. Progressive’s CPE coverage typically insures your custom wheels for up to $5,000.

Tips to Avoid Tire Blowouts

1) Be sure to pick the right tires

Be sure to select the right tires for your vehicle based on tire ratings and check them regularly for safety.

Keep in mind that tires:

  • Are the only link between the vehicle and the road
  • Support the entire weight of the car, which can be a load of up to 50 times its own weight
  • Respond to different driving movements such as steering, acceleration and braking of the car
  • Absorb all obstacles on the road
2) Regularly check the depth of the tire design and change them when worn

In this way, both the grip and the traction will be guaranteed, avoiding unpleasant surprises.

Change the tires before the depth of the sculpture reaches the legal limit of 1.6 mm.

3) Check the pressure every month

Correct tire pressure reduces the risk of losing control of the vehicle. It also protects tires from premature wear and irreversible damage to the internal build.

Tire pressure can be reduced by small perforations, by the natural escape of air from the tire components, or even by a drop in ambient temperature.

Check the tire pressure, including the spare tire, every month and before a long trip – preferably with cold tires (tires that have not circulated more than 4 kilometers at low speed).

If the tires are checked while warm, add 0.3 bar to the recommended pressure.

When Auto Insurance Doesn’t Cover Flat Tires

Although comprehensive coverage and collision insurance cover damage resulting from unexpected events, they don’t cover all incidents. According to Kelley Blue Book, auto insurance coverage won’t cover tire damage in the following situations.

  • Normal wear and tear – Car insurance coverage won’t cover normal wear and tear your car receives. Your insurance only protects you against unexpected situations. Carriers consider changing out old or worn tires as part of the costs of maintaining your vehicle.

  • Road hazards – Insurance won’t pay for nails, glass, or other objects that damage your vehicle’s tires when you drive. You will likely have to pay for these costs out of pocket.

  • Flat tire – Your car insurance policy won’t cover your tire if it suddenly goes flat. If you have a roadside assistance plan with your insurance company, they may help you put on a spare so you can drive someplace to get it repaired or replaced.

Does Insurance Covers Tire Damage from Potholes?

Your policy may cover pothole damage depending on your carrier and the options you have on your car insurance policy. According to the Insurance Information Institute, your insurance provider will cover tire damage that results from potholes if your auto insurance policy has collision coverage.

Collision insurance covers damages to a vehicle that results from accidents with objects like potholes, lamp posts and guard rails. Potholes and other conditions can dent your tire’s rims, shred them, or cause misalignments. In some situations, collision coverage may help to replace or repair tires damaged by potholes.

Some auto insurance providers may not cover this damage under their policies. Review your insurance policy to see if it offers or excludes pothole damage.

Will auto insurance cover a flat tire if I have roadside assistance?

If you are worried about flat tires – whether that’s on your car or on your motorcycle – then getting auto insurance roadside assistance through your insurance company or through a third-party provider like AAA might be your best option for insurance for tires.

Roadside assistance programs won’t cover the cost of replacing your flat tire.

However, they will cover the cost of dispatching someone to your location to change a flat tire or tow your vehicle.

Don’t feel comfortable changing your own tire? Want extra peace of mind? Then roadside assistance policies can help. They typically cost between $50 and $200 per year.

In addition to changing your tire, these programs can deliver fuel to your location if you run out of gas or tow your vehicle to the nearest service station.

Auto Insurance May Cover Vehicle Damage Caused by a Flat Tire

Auto insurance companies will rarely cover the cost of repairing or replacing a flat tire. However, there is a caveat:

Your auto insurance should cover any vehicle damage that was caused by that flat tire.

If you were driving on the freeway and your tire blew out, for example, causing you to skid into the median, then this may be an example of going through your insurance company to get your repairs done.

In other words, your auto insurance should cover the repair costs on the rest of the vehicle, although your tire replacement will not be covered.

Manufacturer, Retailer, and Installer Liability

It’s not always the case that the driver is the culprit of an accident involving a tire blowout.

While it is true that drivers are held accountable for keeping their cars in shape and driving with caution on the road, there can still be some accidents which are beyond their control.

For example, if you had your car inspected by a professional mechanic and he did not find the flaw that caused the car crash, then he may be the one to be fully or partially liable, depending on the situation.

Another scenario in which the driver would not be at fault would be if a mechanic incorrectly installs a tire or mounts the wrong type of tire; this could result in the tires deflating, bursting, popping out, and other unintended consequences.

Furthermore, if a retailer knew they were selling a defective or old tire, they could be held liable as well. Lastly, the manufacturers that create the tires are responsible if their tire is defective or dangerous in a design that leads to a blowout on the highway.

This was famously the case in the year 2000 when Firestone recalled approximately 6.5 million tires used in Ford’s utility vehicles, and other light trucks on the market. US authorities concluded a possible link between tire failures and accidents that killed 46 people during that year.

Other Types Of Coverage

You can also get other types of tire-related coverage options depending on the situation. 

Does Roadside Assistance Cover Tires?

While roadside assistance won’t pay for tire damage or a tire replacement, it can still be helpful to have. If you get a flat or experience a blowout on the road, roadside assistance will send someone to tow your vehicle or help to replace your damaged tire with a new tire. 

Check if you have roadside assistance through your auto insurance company or through your car manufacturer.

Road Hazard Protection Plans

So, does insurance cover tire damage besides slashing or potholes and road spikes? In most cases, no. On the other hand, dealerships, auto manufacturers, and extended warranty companies offer road hazard protection plans that can cover certain types of tire failures. Usually, these are limited to hazards encountered in normal driving, not vandalism or slashed tires. 

Can Roadside Assistance Help You with Flat Tires?

One caveat to receiving assistance for a flat tire from your car insurance company is if you have roadside assistance as part of your coverage. Having this coverage may involve either an additional monthly fee or it could be included in your insurance plan.

While roadside assistance does not pay for your tire replacement, the insurance company does provide towing services to bring your car to the nearest mechanic. This service comes at either no charge or a minor fee if the repair shop is farther than a certain distance, usually five or 10 miles, which can save you money.

Roadside assistance may also help you change your tire, if you have a spare, so you can get back on the road quicker. If they bring a new tire to you, you would still be charged for the tire.

Running over a sharp object on the road, whether you can see it or not, can cause a flat tire.

Frequently Asked Questions: Are tire blowouts covered by insurance?

We hope we’ve answered all your questions, but if you want to learn more, below are some frequently asked questions about tire blowouts.

#1 – How much does it cost to fix a blown-out tire and what kind of damage can a tire blowout cause?

If you catch it early it could be as little as $15–$30, and a tire blowout could cause damage to other vehicles around you ranging in severity from a fender bender to a pileup.

#2 – Can a tire blowout be fixed and is a tire blowout considered an accident?

If it is a shoulder puncture, maybe. If you have a sidewall puncture, no.  A tire blowout is not considered an accident unless other vehicles are involved.

#3 – Do tire warranties cover nails or flats?

Many warranties cover damage due to road hazards, such as nail punctures and the repair cost is covered for the warranty’s duration.

#4 – Do tire warranties cover dry rot or sidewall damage?

If the dry rot happens significantly earlier than it should or if the damage is due to a manufacturing or workmanship error.

#5 – Do tire warranties cover punctures or blowouts? Do tire warranties cover bubbles?

Yes, if they are the result of a manufacturing error. They are not tire insurance companies, however, and don’t cover accidents.

#6 – Does a tire warranty cover nails or sidewall damage?

Yes, almost always in the case of a nail.  In the case of sidewall damage it would have to be a manufacturing failure.

#7 – Does Geico cover tire blowout?

If you have Geico Emergency Road Service. What about other companies? Does State Farm cover tire blowouts? Some coverage is available with roadside assistance, but not the tire.

#8 – Does car insurance cover tire blowout damage?

Most likely not, unless it was due to theft, vandalism, or a vehicle collision.

#9 – Is tire blowout damage comprehensive or collision?

Comprehensive will pay for damage to the vehicle caused by the tire blowout, but not the tire itself.

#10 – Does a warranty cover a blown tire? What does a tire warranty cover?

Road hazard warranties will cover repair or replacement fees for flat tires. What does a tire and wheel warranty cover? Usually, the warranty protects the consumer from manufacturing defects or faulty materials used in the tire. It also covers a vehicle in the event of damage caused by a road hazard, such as glass, potholes, debris, and nails.

References:

 

Are tire blowouts really a big deal?

Yes, tire blowouts are absolutely a big deal, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data. Tire blowouts cause over 500 fatalities and over 23,000 accidents per year in the United States. In 2017 alone, there were 738 traffic fatalities in tire-related crashes.

That’s more than one blowout fatality a day, and over 60 accidents a day caused by tire blowouts throughout the country.

To go even further with this analysis, that’s 10 fatalities for every state per year and over one accident a day per state — all due to tire blowouts.

Imagine you’re heading down the interstate and an 18-wheeler pulling up next to you emits a banging sound as its tire blows and flaps about. Fortunately, the truck is able to pull over safely, but it’s not hard to imagine it swiftly merging into your lane and slamming into your vehicle.

This could be a fatal situation, and you could be part of a scary statistic.

Now imagine you’re in a four-door sedan, traveling 70 mph in a 70 mph speed limit zone. You’re doing what you’re supposed to, right? Yes, but if you experience a blowout in one of your front tires, your vehicle will yank in the direction of the deflated or blown tire.

At that speed, it’s quite conceivable that your car could experience a rollover. At 70 mph the ramifications would be dreadful.

These examples are why preventative measures must be taken to ensure your safety and the safety of your loved ones, not to mention others on the road.

Here’s a video with some helpful tips.

These examples also are meant to show no driver negligence. While some tire failures can be prevented and are due to owner negligence in terms of tire maintenance, the truth is many blowout-related accidents can be directly attributed to structurally compromised tires sold by a variety of manufacturers.

Essentially, without proper care, what people pay for can lead to tragic results. So, let’s take a look at how these tragic results can be avoided.

How Insurance Can Cover Slashed Tires

Depending on the cause, most auto insurance policies allow you to use either comprehensive coverage or collision coverage to pay for the damage.

It does not matter how many tires have been slashed. If you have the right coverage, it will cover one to four (or more) tires as long as the cost exceeds your car insurance deductible

Comprehensive Covers Acts Of Vandalism

Comprehensive car insurance protects your vehicle when it’s damaged by something other than a collision. This includes things like fire, severe weather, collision with animals, theft, and vandalism. Slashed tires are considered a type of vandalism.

Be aware that most insurance companies pay to restore your vehicle to its state before the accident. The insurer will subtract value to account for the milage your tires had before being slashed. So, you’ll get new tires, but you might have to pay for a portion of the cost.

Collision Covers Potholes Or Road Spikes

Collision coverage can protect you and your vehicle when you get into a collision with another vehicle or an object. So, this type of coverage could also cover tire damage from running over a pothole or road spikes.

Again, it’s smart to check with your car insurance company to learn the specifics of your collision coverage to make sure it covers damaged tires. To find out more about coverage available in the car insurance industry, we recommend comparing multiple car insurance quotes. Enter your zip code below to get started.

 

Does Car Insurance Cover Tire Blowouts?

Extreme temperatures, overinflation, tread wear, and road debris can cause tires to lose air or pop. When this happens, you might wonder if auto insurance will cover a tire blowout.

Insurance coverage for blowouts are similar to that of a flat tire: the tire itself isn't covered through the policy, but any damage you incur might be covered. It also depends upon the type of coverage you have.

For instance, if your tire pops on the highway and the tire flies off your vehicle causing damage, comprehensive coverage will likely pay for the vehicle's body damage. If the popped tire causes you to lose control and swerve off the road where you hit a tree, collision coverage covers the body damage.

In either situation, only the damages are covered. It's your responsibility to replace the tire, however, and that cost doesn't count toward the deductible if you choose to file a claim.

9. Will Auto Insurance Cover Tire Damage?

Aug 6, 2019 — Auto insurance never covers tires that burst due to normal wear and tear. That means that if a sharp object penetrates the tire, your auto (27)

USAA roadside assistance will send help 24/7 if your car breaks down, needs a tow, has a flat tire and more. Request service faster on USAA app.(28)

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